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Find every mans thumbscrew

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Account Options Connexion. Afficher l'e-book. Baltasar Gracian Morales. There is, perhaps, no better time than now to go back to the basics.

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Discover Each Man’s Thumbscrew | Exploring The 48 Laws of Power – Law 33

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This makes me question the ethics [or lack thereof] behind this law. But isn't it that others should learn how to help these people with their respective weaknesses in order to make them better people for a better-functioning society?

This law is simply stating that one must be on the look-out for his peers' weaknesses so that he will be able to "hit" them through these weak points and use these to his advantage. Does one's search for power really entail that others should be subordinated contrary to these "subordinated's" prerogative?

And how would you know if you've gone past doing this "just for power? This law is interesting. I didn't even know that weaknesses or insecurities develop usually during childhood.

Knowing the tactics mentioned is really a force to be recognized. The key is finding the weakness and focus all your firepower towards that crack. A boulder is very hard. If you punch it, most probably nothing will happen but if you are like water wherein it sips inside the boulder. Through time, it will cause the boulder to crack and then eventually crumble. I have a fear of heights.

How can anyone possibly use that against me? It pays to know about this law because for one thing, you can use it against your enemy and at the same time, you can guard against others using your own weaknesses against you. That is, if you're actually aware of what weaknesses you have. So maybe before going about psychanalyzing and poking at the crack other people have in their defenses, we should start by looking at our own walls for cracks first.

Kinda like being more self-aware. Patty Geollegue HIN. That way you can get control over that person Law 11 Wait. I don't think you have to resort to breaking your moral ethics in order to gain power. I think discovering that thumbscrew is enough. Ian Cadelina HiN. That's actually probably why Greene wrote two laws, "do not go past the mark you aimed for; in victory, learn when to stop", and "plan to the very end".

I mean, if you are to discover each man's thumbscrew for example, you should have had that plan of up to what extent you should discover a man's thumbscrew. It's should be included in this one giant "power" package. I was just curious Is there anything to counter that tactic? I don't think the book is trying to discuss ethical matters- I think Greene wants to leave the ethical matters to ourselves. Greene simply gave us the laws, the application is all up to us.

I like what Patty said about looking at our own walls for cracks first, because in saying that 'everyone has a weakness', we might forget that that includes y-o-u. Master your strengths and weaknesses first! Or, in the words of Lao Tzu, "Mastering others is strength. Mastering yourself is true power.

Jamie: well come to think of it. And through that cleverness, trying to foil your enemy's weakness would be easy then. This law is a double edge sword; You can use i to your advantage, yet the enemy can use it to his advantage as well.

Duey T. Guison Hi18N. In return, he might also discover your own weaknesses without you knowing it. In the end, whenever you would want to use this law, I would suggest that you should be smarter and more cunning than your chosen victim; know thy enemy, know thy self. Using personal secrets against an enemy is something only a weaker person would come to do.

I believe that a victory won through this way is not a victory to praise, nor one to respect. I guess it is a matter of knowing how your enemies think, that would be alright in this case.

He found out that Longus was arrogant and using this information made a plan that would work on his arrogance in order to defeat them. That played a part in how he was able to succeed. When it comes to war, a win is a win. There is no "2nd place" or "honorable mentions". If you got it, you got it. In times of desperation, I really don't think it matters if you did hit below the belt.

While it may be dishonorable to most, who comes out on top is what's most important in the history books. And yes, you have to be more cunning than your opponent when applying this law. For all you know, you're playing into his or her game.

Like Dan said: know thy enemy, know thy self. Figure out your own weaknesses and conceal them before looking for the weaknesses of others. Marvin Velasco Hi18 N. I've always hated power play. It's so Dirty to say the least But no matter how much I could gripe and damn it to oblivion, it remains a fact of life. The best thing about this law is that it embodies how power play could be a double edged weapon.

It's well and good that you know what makes your opponent crumble. But we must realize that it's actually even better for you to know what makes you crumble. And hopefully, when armed with that knowledge, you are to use it for the better. As with all the laws here, it seems that they can only be counted as "good" or "bad" depending on the person who is applying them.

Be it for personal gain or a greater cause. Psychological warfare is awesome I think this is one of the more obvious tactics when it comes to power struggle. Find your opponent's Achilles heel and crush him. Don't stop to think about whether or not it's ethical. The adage goes, "all is fair in love and war. I'll lure you onto a cliff and inspire fear in you with a beautiful view of the deathly crags below. That's how I'll use your fear against you. Marion is right.

Weaknesses are bound to be discovered. They could be revealed by tiny hints or clues, which makes them hard to detect, yet still manageable. This is where you have to apply certain techniques to bring them out, such as what I mentioned in my entry, where you could open up to your targets to make them spill the beans.

Discovering one's thumbscrew isn't one of those things you can learn overnight. It takes experience, and of course, a crafty mind. Everyone has weaknesses. It depends on how to exploit the weakness. Very interesting yet normal at the same time. We use this all the time during matches, contests, etc. Don Faylon Hi18N. I'm getting brainwashed by all this commenting These Laws of Power, however effective, seems to be all about how to get what you want--and in the process, deceiving and manipulating others I agree with Jamie Bauza: I don't believe in stepping on other people's weaknesses to get what you want.

It's just too unethical. It's picking a fight with a disabled person Eric, it's hard to deny that this law is unethical, since I'm sure most, if not all of us were raised to be respectable members of society.

There just comes a time when you have to apply such a law for your own survival or probably even the safety of someone close to you. At such a time, anything goes, even if it involves playing dirty.

Just keep this law in mind so you can use it for the right moment. You never know what perils may await you. Discovering a thumbscrew may save you. Like as mentioned in the other laws, people are bound to their imperfections. Use them, and turn them to benefit us. Katherine Conde Hi18 O. Don't think about how you use this power on others, think more about how you don't let others use it on you.

Law 33: Discover Each Man’s Thumbscrew (The 48 Laws of Power)

It is the art of setting their wills in action. It needs more skill than resolution. You must know where to get at any one.

Al-Saadiq Banks made his entrance into the literary world in He and his brother Naim Banks.

Bjork's edition of Hardy's notebooks excels in meticulous attention to detail, documentation, and annotation. The preface identifies textual material, and the critical introduction provides helpful Consulter l'avis complet. He also became an avid reader. Upon graduation, Hardy traveled to London to work as an architect's assistant under the guidance of Arthur Bloomfield.

Find Each Man’s Thumbscrew

Shortform has the world's best summaries of books you should be reading. Like this article? Sign up for a free trial here. Everyone has a weakness, a hole in his armor, a thumbscrew. Everyone has a weakness, a button you can find and push. Some people show their weaknesses openly while others hide them. You can most effectively exploit the weaknesses of those who hide them.

Law 33: Discover Each Man’s Thumbscrew (48 Laws of Power)

Everyone has a weakness. Usually, it is an insecurity, an irrational need, or an emotion. It can even be a secret pleasure. When it has been discovered, it can be used as an advantage.

At first the job is as lively as Latin, but Laura begins to notice Jaouen's increasingly strange behavior.

This makes me question the ethics [or lack thereof] behind this law. But isn't it that others should learn how to help these people with their respective weaknesses in order to make them better people for a better-functioning society? This law is simply stating that one must be on the look-out for his peers' weaknesses so that he will be able to "hit" them through these weak points and use these to his advantage.

For me, like spying, use this tactic on your enemy. In this way, you know everything that they can throw on you, and counter it. State the Samson story for example, Delilah found out the thumbscrew of Samson, which the enemy, the Philistines, used against him. I agree with the previous comments.

We all have resistances. We live with a perpetual armour around ourselves to defend against change and the intrusive actions of friends and rivals. One of the most important things to realize about people is that they all have a weakness, some part of their psychological armor that will not resist, that will bend to your will, if you will find it and push on it. Some people wear their weaknesses openly, others disguise them. Those, who diguise them, are often the ones most effectively undone, through the chink in their armor. As Sigmund Freud remaked, "No mortal can keep a secret.

Everyone has a weakness, a gap in the castle wall. That weakness is usually insecurity, an uncontrollable emotion or need; it can also be a small secret pleasure. Either way, once found, it is a thumbscrew you can turn to your advantage. One of the most important things to realize about people is that they all have a weakness, some part of their psychological armor that will not resist, that will bend to your will if you find it and push on it. Some people wear their weaknesses openly, others disguise them. Those who disguise them are often the ones most effectively undone through that one chink in their armor. In planning your assault, keep these Six principles in mind: 1.

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Everyone has a weakness, a gap in the castle wall. That weakness is usually an insecurity, an uncontrollable emotion or need; it can also be a small secret pleasure. Either way, once found, it is a thumbscrew you can turn to your advantage. We all have resistances.

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